Page tree

Versions Compared

Key

  • This line was added.
  • This line was removed.
  • Formatting was changed.

...

As described in the GeneralArchitecture topic, the root of the context tree for any of the profile flows is the ProfileRequestContext class. Beyond that commonality, all of the "typical" federation profiles have a common approach to their configuration and how its exposed in the context tree.

...

By convention, the resolution of the appropriate RPC to use for a request is represented by attaching a net.shibboleth.idp.profile.context.RelyingPartyContext child context to the ProfileRequestContext. Both the RPC and the specific profile configuration in effect are captured by that context, along with information about the identity of the relying party and whether that identity was verified or not.

...

The default implementation relies on a reloadable configuration resource and just iterates through an ordered list of registered RPC objects, evaluating the current ProfileRequestContext against the RPC's predicate. The first RPC with a predicate to return an affirmative result is the RPC that's used for the request. In addition, the resolver stores two special RPCs: a default "verified" one to apply in the absence of a more specific rule, and an "unverified" one to apply in the event that the identity of the relying party can't be verified, in a fashion that depends on the profile used (in the case of SAML, a RP can only be verified if metadata is provided for it).

...

There is no specific input contract, since profiles vary in their function, but as a general rule, inbound interceptors can assume that the ProfileRequestContext's inbound MessageContext tree is fully populated, and when possible a RelyingPartyContext child context will have been created, along with any contexts needed to drive functions like transport or message authentication.

...

The inverse of the inbound case, the outbound interceptors run just before the final stage of message processing that will issue a response to the client. As such, the input contract is essentially "the entire state of the tree produced by the requested profile execution", whatever that happens to be. That will typically include a populated outbound MessageContext tree, although the message may not be in its absolutely final form (e.g., signing may be yet to happen).

...